‘Underdeveloped Economists’: The Study of Economic Development in Latin America in the 1950s

By Stella Krepp

The 1950s were a decade full of aspirations and struggles all over the globe and in a specific way for Latin America. Excluded from the vision of the West and Western infrastructure, such as NATO, while also not part of the socialist bloc, the so-called second world, Latin America was trying to come to grips with its place in the world. This paper will trace the shift in political economic thought in the 1950s, explaining how cepalismo played a central role in defining underdevelopment, at a time when the idea of a Third World was still in its infancy.

 

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Environmental Rationality: The Social Re-Appropriation of Nature

Environmental Rationality: The Social Re-Appropriation of Nature

BY ENRIQUE LEFF

The environmental crisis emerges like a civilizational crisis: a crisis of Western culture; of modern rationality; of the globalized world-economy. It is neither an ecological catastrophe, nor a simple imbalance in the economy. It is the dislocation of the world which results from the reification of being and the overexploitation of nature; it is the loss of existential meaning that comes from rationalistic thought in its negation of otherness.

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