Sumak Kawsay, Feminisms and Post-Growth: Linkages to Imagine New Utopias

Sumak Kawsay, Feminisms and Post-Growth: Linkages to Imagine New Utopias

By Silvia Vega Ugalde

This article explores the different understandings of gender that correspond to different concepts of sumak kawsay, tackling both ‘gender’ and ‘sumak kawsay’ as polysemous concepts. The article focuses specifically on the degrowth perspective, which is part of the ecological post-developmental understanding of sumak kawsay. It explores the implications that follow from these perspectives when questioning androcentric gender relationships. Additionally, the article exposes the meanings which the feminist economics of rupture attributes to the conceptual category of ‘the sustainability of life’, highlighting the overlaps and divergences with the post-growth understanding of that same category. The article defends the importance of resituating political and feminist debates under utopic horizons, such as those of sumak kawsay and post-growth.  

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Buen vivir: new wine in old wineskins?

Buen vivir: new wine in old wineskins?

By Adrian E. Beling & Julien Vanhulst

What is Buen vivir, why is it interesting, and what makes it relevant beyond its birth-land in the Andean-Amazonian region of the Americas? Is it aything new at all, or is it just a rehashed and overrated discourse? What prospects are there for Buen vivir as the organizing principle of a cultural model for global sustainability? In the limited space of the article that follows, we intend to explore these and similar questions around an idea that has unexpectedly popped-up in global academic and political debates in recent years.

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Buen Vivir, Sumak Kawsay, 'Good Living': An Introduction and Overview

Buen Vivir, Sumak Kawsay, 'Good Living': An Introduction and Overview

By Johannes Waldmüller

This overview and introduction to Buen Vivir and/or Sumak Kawsay refers to the context and discussion in Ecuador. It differentiates between Buen Vivir and Sumak Kawsay as well as between (at least) three main types of this vast field of discourses and practices: (1) a state-led program for the 'socialism of the 21st century"; (2) a post-modern utopian and intellectual project, drawing on indigenous Andean values; and (3) an (essentializing) 'indigenist' form of living and thinking that adds spiritual ontological dimensions, based on individually and collectively acquiring a practice of all-connected consciousness.

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