The Trinity of Buen Vivir in Ecuador

Hidalgo picture.jpg

By Antonio Luis Hidalgo-Capitán & Ana Patricia Cubillo-Guevara

 

Buen Vivir, as an alternative concept to development (Acosta 2012, Cubillo-Guevara & Hidalgo-Capitán 2015a), emerged in Ecuador at the beginning of the 1990s, with the contribution of some Amazonian Kichwa intellectuals, under the name of sumak kawsay (Viteri et al. 1992, Viteri 1993, Viteri 2000, Cubillo-Guevara & Hidalgo-Capitán 2015b); however, it did not gain relevance until the 2008 Ecuadorian Constitutions included it as a principle (Vanhulst and Beling 2016).

This concept has been defined as a way of life in harmony with oneself (identity), with society (equity) and with nature (sustainability) (Cubillo-Guevara, Hidalgo-Capitán & García-Álvarez 2016). This definition was commonly accepted by the majority of intellectuals and politicians who used the term since the drafting of the 2008 Constitution; but here the consensus ended, since this way of living in harmony took on very different meanings according to the ideological position of each intellectual and politician who used the concept. Thus, there have been at least three ways of understanding Buen Vivir in Ecuador: one indigenist, another socialist and another ecologist / post-developmentalist (Le-Quang & Vercoutère 2013, Cubillo-Guevara, Hidalgo-Capitán & Domínguez-Gómez 2014, Vanhulst 2015).

The first conceptualization was part of the indigenist thought of the intellectuals associated with the Ecuadorian indigenous movement (Hidalgo-Capitán, Guillén & Deleg 2014) who understood the Buen Vivir as sumak kawsay or plenty life, and rejected modern development as a social aspiration, considering it as another form of colonization (coloniality of power) (Quijano 2000). These intellectuals proposed the re-creation in the 21st century of the harmonious conditions of life that the original peoples of Ecuador enjoyed. They tried to do so by positioning the so-called Andean worldview (Estermann 1998) as the main cultural reference of the country, in a way that would allow a recovery of the lost Andean identity and instigate a change of civilization. This approach placed great importance on the self-determination of indigenous peoples and proposed converting Ecuador into a Plurinational State, following the mandate set forth in the 2008 Constitution. In addition, these intellectuals considered the recovery of the ancestral traditions of these peoples to be of great importance and paid special attention to the spiritual elements related to Buen Vivir (for example, Pachamama) (Oviedo 2011). Most of these positions correspond to a premodern conception of the world, of Andean and Amazonian ancestral natures. The intellectuals who defended this conception of Buen Vivir were considered by some intellectuals of the other two streams as pachamamistas (folkloric), caught in the discourse of an infantile indigenism and without the ability to implement Buen Vivir. Indigenist thought about Buen Vivir had a certain relevance during the constituent debates of 2007 and 2008, while the Ecuadorian indigenous movement was allied with the ruling party Alianza PAÍS. Nevertheless, the movement’s subsequent distancing from the latter meant that its positions were not included in the Ecuadorian public policy. However, the indigenist concept of Buen Vivir, such as sumak kawsay, was part of the political discourse of opposition to the government of Rafael Correa and Alianza PAÍS.

The second conception was part of the neo-Marxist thought of intellectuals associated with the government of Ecuador (Ramírez 2010, SENPLADES 2010), who understood the good life as the socialism of  sumak kawsay, or as the 21st century Ecuadorian variant of the socialism, assimilating modern development in its neo-Marxist strand. These intellectuals proposed the implementation of a new development model, through a revolutionary process called citizen revolution, aimed essentially at improving equity and supported initially by extractivism while the transformation of the Ecuadorian productive matrix occurred (SENPLADES 2012; Braña, Domínguez & León 2016). In this sense, they left the achievement of identity and sustainability objectives in the background. This approach placed great importance to the role that the State should play in the implementation of Buen Vivir (SENPLADES 2011), which became the main political agent and sole interpreter of the popular will, excluding from political action the different social movements that contributed to making Buen Vivir part of the Constitution (for example, to the indigenous movement or the environmental movement). In addition, they aspired to transform the Ecuadorian socioeconomic system into a post-capitalist one, in an economy with a market, but not a market economy, where the entities of the popular and solidary economy played a major role (Coraggio 2007). Most of these positions correspond to a modern conception of the world, of a Western and socialist nature. The intellectuals who defended this conceptualization of Buen Vivir were considered by some intellectuals of the other two streams as practitioners of a deliquescent developmentalism. They also were criticized for having substituted the term ‘development’ in their discourses for the term Buen Vivir, thus equating both concepts and emptying Buen Vivir of most of the dimensions that were incorporated into the constitutional process. The neo-Marxist conceptualization of Buen Vivir, which developed after the constitutional debates of 2007 and 2008, has been the most influential in Ecuadorian public policy, inspiring the National Plans for Buen Vivir (SENPLADES 2009 & 2013) of the governments of Rafael Correa and Alianza PAÍS.

The third conception was part of the ecologist/post-developmentalist thought of the intellectuals associated with Ecuadorian social movements (Acosta & Martínez 2009, Acosta 2012) who understood Buen Vivir as an utopia to (re)build (Acosta 2011), or as the territorial concretization of the constitutional concept of Buen Vivir, and who rejected modern development as a social aspiration, considering it a form of domination. These intellectuals proposed the creation of local processes of social participation through which each community had to define its own Buen Vivir, or Buen “Convivir”, making environmental sustainability a prerequisite for the construction of such good co-livings (Gudynas & Acosta 2011). In this sense, they subordinated the achievement of the objectives of equity and identity toward the maintenance of harmonious relations with nature, through respect for the Rights of Nature set forth in the Ecuadorian Constitution (Acosta & Martínez 2011). In fact, they proposed the construction of a bio-centric society, where nature occupied the center of the concerns of Ecuadorians, who should be considered as an inseparable part of it. Most of these concepts correspond to a postmodern conception of the world, of a Western nature. The intellectuals who defended this conception of Buen Vivir were considered by some intellectuals of the other two streams as lacking in political pragmatism, imbued in certain nihilism. They were criticized for being trapped in a discourse of infantile ecologism and for having distorted the meaning of Buen Vivir, by filling it with Western contents alien to the Andean worldview. The ecologist/post-developmentalist thought about Buen Vivir had certain relevance during the constitutional debates of 2007 and 2008, when some of its main representatives were part of the official party Alianza PAÍS and its affiliated social movements. However, the subsequent distancing between the social movements and this party meant that its positions lost weight in Ecuadorian public policy and only had certain relevance in the National Plans for Buen Vivir 2009-2013 (SENPLADES 2009). That said, as with the indigenist conception, this conceptualization of Buen Vivir formed part of the opposition’s political discourse against the government of Rafael Correa and Alianza PAÍS.

Despite the trifurcation of the concept of Buen Vivir (indigenist, socialist and ecologist/post-developmentalist), it was a legitimate goal to aspire to the confluence of these three streams in one conceptualization of Buen Vivir, based on the search for identity, equity and sustainability, through the transformation of Ecuador into a pluri-national, post-capitalist and bio-centric society (Cubillo-Guevara, Hidalgo-Capitán & García-Álvarez 2016). This was not possible under the Rafael Correa governments, but it could be more viable now, after the Lenin Moreno’s replacement of Rafael Correa as the head of the Presidency of the Republic of Ecuador, and with a rapprochement between the new Alianza PAÍS of Moreno and the different Ecuadorian social movements, including the indigenous movement. However, this moment coincides with the abandonment of Buen Vivir as a central principle in the speeches of the different progressive Ecuadorian political actors (Cubillo-Guevara 2016) and with the loss of relevance of the concept of Buen Vivir in Ecuadorian public policies, especially in the National Development Plan 2017-2021 (SENPLADES 2017).

In the international academic field, the concept of Buen Vivir is gaining increasing prominence, emerging as a synthesized concept that includes elements of the three versions of Buen Vivir in the discursive framework of trans-modern trans-development (Cubillo-Guevara & Hidalgo-Capitán 2015c; Hidalgo-Capitán & Cubillo-Guevara 2016), which contributes to the twinning of Buen Vivir with the European concept of degrowth (Unceta 2013). This view of Buen Vivir make it a trinity, a concept that is both one and triune; converging the three different conceptions (indigenist, socialist and ecologist/post-developmentalist) in one true Buen Vivir (trans-modern).

 

*** Spanish version below ***

 

El buen vivir, como concepto alternativo al desarrollo (Acosta 2012; Cubillo-Guevara e Hidalgo-Capitán 2015a), surgió en Ecuador a comienzos de la década de los noventa, de la mano de algunos intelectuales kichwas amazónicos, bajo la denominación de sumak kawsay (Viteri et al. 1992; Viteri 1993; Viteri 2000; Cubillo-Guevara e Hidalgo-Capitán 2015b); sin embargo, no adquirió relevancia hasta que fue incluido como precepto en la Constitución ecuatoriana de 2008 (Vanhulst y Beling 2016).

Dicho concepto ha sido definido como una forma de vida en armonía con uno mismo (identidad), con la sociedad (equidad) y con la naturaleza (sostenibilidad) (Cubillo-Guevara, Hidalgo-Capitán y García-Álvarez 2016). Esta definición fue comúnmente aceptada por la mayoría de los intelectuales y los políticos que utilizaban dicho término desde la redacción de la Constitución de 2008; pero aquí terminó el consenso, ya que dicha forma de vida en armonía cobró significados muy diferentes según la posición ideológica de cada intelectual y político que utilizaba el concepto. Así, han existido al menos tres maneras de entender el buen vivir en Ecuador: una indigenista, otra socialista y otra ecologista / posdesarrollista (Le-Quang y Vercoutère 2013; Cubillo-Guevara, Hidalgo-Capitán y Domínguez-Gómez 2014; Vanhulst 2015).

La primera concepción fue la propia del pensamiento indigenista de los intelectuales vinculados con el movimiento indígena ecuatoriano (Hidalgo-Capitán, Guillén y Deleg 2014) que entendían el buen vivir como sumak kawsay o vida en plenitud, y rechazaban el desarrollo moderno como aspiración social por considerarlo una forma más de colonización (colonialidad del poder) (Quijano 2000). Estos intelectuales proponían la recreación en el siglo XXI de las condiciones armónicas de vida que tenían los pueblos originarios de Ecuador; y pretendían hacerlo por medio de la colocación de la llamada cosmovisión andina (Estermann 1998) como el principal referente cultural del país, de manera que permitiese recuperar la identidad andina perdida y propiciar un cambio de civilización. Dicho enfoque concedía gran relevancia a la autodeterminación de los pueblos indígenas y proponía convertir a Ecuador en un Estado plurinacional, siguiendo el mandato recogido en la Constitución de 2008. Además, otorgaban gran importancia a la recuperación de las tradiciones ancestrales de dichos pueblos y prestaban una especial atención a los elementos espirituales relacionados con el buen vivir (por ejemplo, la Pachamama) (Oviedo 2011). La mayor parte de estos postulados se corresponden con una concepción premoderna del mundo, de naturaleza ancestral andina y amazónica. Los intelectuales que defendían esta concepción del buen vivir fueron considerados por algunos intelectuales de las otras dos corrientes como pachamamistas (folclóricos), atrapados en el discurso de un indigenismo infantil y sin capacidad para implementar el buen vivir. El pensamiento indigenista sobre el buen vivir tuvo una cierta relevancia durante los debates constituyentes de 2007 y 2008, mientras el movimiento indígena ecuatoriano fue aliado del partido oficialista Alianza PAÍS; sin embargo, su posterior distanciamiento de éste hizo que sus postulados no fuesen incluidos en la política pública ecuatoriana. No obstante, el concepto indigenista de buen vivir, como sumak kawsay, formó parte del discurso político de oposición al gobierno de Rafael Correa y Alianza PAÍS.

La segunda concepción fue la propia del pensamiento neomarxista de los intelectuales vinculados con el gobierno de Ecuador (Ramírez 2010; SENPLADES 2010), que entendían el buen vivir como socialismo del sumak kawsay, o como la variante ecuatoriana del socialismo del siglo XXI, y lo asimilaban al desarrollo moderno en su variante neomarxista. Estos intelectuales proponían la implementación, por medio de un proceso revolucionario denominado Revolución Ciudadana, de un nuevo modelo de desarrollo orientado esencialmente a la mejora de la equidad y apoyado, inicialmente, en el extractivismo, mientras se producía la transformación de la matriz productiva ecuatoriana (SENPLADES 2012; Braña, Domínguez y León 2016). En este sentido, dejaban en un segundo plano la consecución de los objetivos de identidad y de sostenibilidad. Dicho enfoque concedía gran relevancia al papel que debía jugar el Estado en la implementación del buen vivir (SENPLADES 2011), el cual se convirtió en el agente político principal e intérprete único de la voluntad popular, excluyendo de la acción política a los diferentes movimientos sociales que contribuyeron a llevar dicho concepto hasta la Constitución (por ejemplo, al movimiento indígena o al movimiento ecologista). Además, aspiraban a la transformación del sistema socioeconómico ecuatoriano en un sistema socioeconómico poscapitalista, en una economía con mercado, pero no de mercado, donde las entidades de la economía popular y solidaria tuviesen un gran protagonismo (Coraggio 2007). La mayor parte de estos postulados se corresponden con una concepción moderna del mundo, de naturaleza occidental y socialista. Los intelectuales que defendían esta concepción del buen vivir fueron considerados por algunos intelectuales de las otras dos corrientes como practicantes de un desarrollismo senil y criticados por haber sustituido en sus discursos el término desarrollo por el término buen vivir, equiparando así ambos conceptos y vaciando al buen vivir de la mayoría de las dimensiones que se incorporaron en el proceso constituyente. El pensamiento neomarxista sobre el buen vivir, que se desarrolló con posterioridad a los debates constituyentes de 2007 y 2008, ha sido el más influyente en la política pública ecuatoriana, por cuanto inspiró los Planes Nacionales para el Buen Vivir (SENPLADES 2009 y 2013) de los gobiernos de Rafael Correa y Alianza PAÍS.

Y la tercera concepción fue la propia del pensamiento ecologista/posdesarrollista de los intelectuales vinculados con los movimientos sociales de Ecuador (Acosta y Martínez 2009; Acosta 2012) que entendían el buen vivir como una utopía por (re)construir (Acosta, 2011), o como la concreción territorial del precepto constitucional del buen vivir, y rechazaban el desarrollo moderno como aspiración social, por considerarlo una forma de dominación. Estos intelectuales proponían la creación de procesos locales de participación social por medio de los cuales cada comunidad debía definir su propio buen vivir, o buen convivir, poniendo la sostenibilidad ambiental como requisito imprescindible para la construcción de dichos buenos convivires (Gudynas y Acosta 2011). En este sentido, subordinaban la consecución de los objetivos de equidad y de identidad al mantenimiento de relaciones armónicas con la naturaleza, por medio del respeto de los Derechos de la Naturaleza recogidos en la Constitución ecuatoriana (Acosta y Martínez 2011). De hecho, proponían la construcción de una sociedad biocéntrica, donde la Naturaleza ocupase el centro de las preocupaciones de los ecuatorianos, los cuales debían ser considerados como parte inseparable de la misma. La mayor parte de estos postulados se corresponden con una concepción posmoderna del mundo, de naturaleza occidental. Los intelectuales que defendían esta concepción del buen vivir fueron considerados por algunos intelectuales de las otras dos corrientes como carentes de pragmatismo político, imbuidos en un cierto nihilismo, y criticados por estar atrapados en un discurso propio de un ecologismo infantil y por haber tergiversado el significado del buen vivir, al llenarlo de contenidos occidentales ajenos a la cosmovisión andina. El pensamiento ecologista/posdesarrollista sobre el buen vivir tuvo una cierta relevancia durante los debates constituyentes de 2007 y 2008, cuando algunos de sus principales representantes formaban parte del partido oficialista Alianza PAÍS y de los movimientos sociales coaligados con éste; sin embargo, el posterior distanciamiento entre los movimientos sociales y este partido hizo que sus postulados perdieran peso en la política pública ecuatoriana y sólo tuviesen una cierta relevancia en el Plan Nacional para el Buen Vivir 2009-2013 (SENPLADES 2009). Aunque, al igual que con la concepción indigenista, su concepto de buen vivir formó parte del discurso político de oposición al gobierno de Rafael Correa y Alianza PAÍS.

A pesar de la trifurcación del concepto de buen vivir (indigenista, socialista y ecologista/posdesarrollista), era legítimo aspirar a la confluencia de las concepciones de estas tres corrientes en un único concepto de buen vivir, basado en la búsqueda de la identidad, de la equidad y de la sostenibilidad, por medio de la transformación de Ecuador en una sociedad plurinacional, poscapitalista y biocéntrica (Cubillo-Guevara, Hidalgo-Capitán y García-Álvarez 2016). Ello no fue posible bajo los gobiernos de Rafael Correa, pero podría ser más viable ahora, tras la sustitución de Rafael Correa por Lenin Moreno al frente de la Presidencia de la República del Ecuador, y cuando se está produciendo un acercamiento entre la nueva Alianza PAÍS de Moreno y los diferentes movimientos sociales ecuatorianos, incluido el movimiento indígena. Sin embargo, este momento coincide con el abandono del buen vivir como concepto estrella de los discursos de los diferentes actores políticos progresistas ecuatorianos (Cubillo-Guevara 2016) y con la pérdida de relevancia del concepto de buen vivir en las políticas públicas ecuatorianas, especialmente en el Plan Nacional de Desarrollo 2017-2021 (SENPLADES 2017).

No obstante, en el ámbito académico internacional, el concepto de buen vivir está cobrando un creciente protagonismo, perfilándose como un concepto sintético que recoge elementos de las tres versiones del buen vivir en el marco discursivo del transdesarrollo transmoderno (Cubillo-Guevara e Hidalgo-Capitán 2015c; Hidalgo-Capitán y Cubillo-Guevara 2016), que contribuye a hermanar el buen vivir con el concepto europeo de decrecimiento (Unceta 2013).

Y todo ello convierte al buen vivir en una trinidad, en un concepto trinitario, en un concepto que es a la vez uno y trino; tres concepciones distintas (indigenista, socialista y ecologista/posdesarrollista) y un único buen vivir verdadero (transmoderno).

 

Antonio Luis Hidalgo-Capitan is professor at the Universidad de Huelva in Spain. Ana Patricia Cubillo-Guevara and himself are member of the research group 'Transdisciplinarios'.

 

References

Acosta, A. (2001): “El buen (con)vivir, una utopía por (re)construir: alcances de la Constitución de Montecristi”, Obets, 6(1): 35-67.

Acosta, A. (2012): Buen Vivir - Sumak Kawsay. Quito (Ecuador): Abya Yala.

Acosta, A. y Martínez, E. (eds.) (2009): El Buen Vivir. Quito (Ecuador): Abya Yala.

Acosta, A. y Martínez, E. (eds.) (2011): La naturaleza con derechos. Quito (Ecuador): Abya Yala.

Braña, F., Domínguez, R. y León-Guzmán, M. (eds.) (2016): Buen Vivir y cambio de la matriz productiva. Quito (Ecuador): FES-ILDIS.

Coraggio, J. L. (2007): “La economía social y la búsqueda de un programa socialista para el siglo XXI”, Foro, 62: 37-54.

Cubillo-Guevara, A. P. (2016): “Genealogía inmediata de los discursos del buen vivir en Ecuador (1992-2016)”, Revista América Latina Hoy, 74: 125-44.

Cubillo-Guevara, A. P. e Hidalgo-Capitán, A. L. (2015a): “El buen vivir como alternativa al desarrollo”, Perspectiva Socioeconómica, 2: 5-27.

Cubillo-Guevara, A. P. e Hidalgo-Capitán, A. L. (2015b): “El trans-desarrollo como manifestación de la trans-modernidad”, Revista de Economía Mundial, 41, 12758.

Cubillo-Guevara, A. P. e Hidalgo-Capitán, A. L. (2015a): “El sumak kawsay genuino como fenómeno social amazónico ecuatoriano”, Obets, 10(2): 301-333.

Cubillo-Guevara, A. P., Hidalgo-Capitán, A. L. y Domínguez-Gómez, J. A. (2014): “El pensamiento sobre el buen vivir. Entre el indigenismo, el socialismo y el postdesarrollismo”, Reforma y Democracia, 60: 27-58.

Cubillo-Guevara, A. P., Hidalgo-Capitán, A. L. y García-Álvarez, S. (2016): “El buen vivir como alternativa al desarrollo para América Latina”, Revista Iberoamericana de Estudios del Desarrollo, 5(2): 30-57.

Estermann, J. (1998): Filosofía andina. Quito (Ecuador): Abya Yala.

Gudynas, E. y Acosta, A. (2011): “El Buen Vivir más allá del desarrollo”, Revista Qué Hacer, 181: 70-81.

Hidalgo-Capitán, A. L. y Cubillo-Guevara, A. P. (2016): Transmodernidad y transdesarrollo. El decrecimiento y el buen vivir como dos versiones análogas de un transdesarrollo transmoderno. Huelva (España): Ediciones Bonanza.

Hidalgo-Capitán, A. L., Guillén, A. y Deleg, N. (eds.) (2014): Sumak Kawsay Yuyay. Antología del pensamiento indigenistas ecuatoriano sobre el sumak kawsay. Huelva (España): CIM y PYDLOS.

Le-Quang, M. y Vercoutère, T. (2013): Ecosocialismo y Buen Vivir. Quito: IAEN.

Oviedo, A. (2011): Qué es el sumaKawsay. Más allá del capitalismo y del socialismo. Quito (Ecuador): Sumak.

Quijano, A. (2000): “Colonialidad del poder y clasificación social”, Journal of World Systems Research, 1(2): 342-86.

Ramírez, R. (2010): Socialismo del Sumak Kawsay o biosocialismo republicano. Quito (Ecuador): SENPLADES.

SENPLADES (2009): Plan Nacional para el Buen Vivir 2009-2013. Quito (Ecuador): SENPLADES.

SENPLADES (2010): Socialismo y Sumak Kawsay. Quito (Ecuador): SENPLADES.

SENPLADES (2011): Recuperación del Estado para el Buen Vivir. La experiencia ecuatoriana de transformación del Estado. Quito (Ecuador): SENPLADES.

SENPLADES (2012): Transformación de la matriz productiva. Quito (Ecuador): SENPLADES.

SENPLADES (2013): Plan Nacional para el Buen Vivir 2013-2017. Quito (Ecuador): SENPLADES.

SENPLADES (2017): Plan Nacional de Desarrollo 2017-2021. Quito (Ecuador): SENPLADES.

Unceta, K. (2013): “Decrecimiento y buen vivir. ¿Paradigmas convergentes?” Revista de Economía Mundial 35: 197-216.

Vanhulst, J. (2015): “El laberinto de los discursos del buen vivir: entre Sumak Kawsay y Socialismo del Siglo XXI”, Polis, 40.

Vanhulst, J. & Beling, A. (2016): “Aportes para una genealogía glocal del buen vivir”. In: F. García-Quero & J. Guardiola (coords.), El Buen Vivir como paradigma societal alternativo, Madrid (España): Economistas Sin Fronteras.

Viteri, A. et ál. (1992): Plan Amazanga [mimeo]. Puyo (Ecuador): OPIP.

Viteri, C. (1993): “Mundos míticos. Runa”. In: N. Paymal y C. Sosa (eds.), Mundos amazónicos. Quito (Ecuador): Ediciones Sinchi Sacha, 148-50.

Viteri, C. (2000): “Visión indígena del desarrollo en la Amazonía”, Polis, 3, 2002.